All posts filed under: Disciplinary law

Court of Quebec judge absolved by inquiry committee

A Court of Quebec judge under fire for allegedly lending more than $9 million in loans over the past few years has been absolved of any ethical breaches by a five-member panel of the Committee of Inquiry of the Conseil de la magistrature du Québec.

Why it matters: The inquiry committee recommended that the judicial council reject the complaint lodged by the Quebec Minister of Justice Stephanie Vallée.

Regulator sanctions five financial advisors

The disciplinary committee of the Chambre de la sécurité financière has had a busy month, sanctioning at least four members in the past month.

The CSF is a unique body in Canada. It maintains and oversees the discipline, training, and ethics of 32,000 professionals practicing in group savings plan brokerage, financial planning, insurance of persons, group insurance of persons, and scholarship plan brokerage. In all Canadian provinces except Quebec, mutual fund dealers and representatives are subject solely to securities regulatory organizations like the Mutual Fund Dealers Association of Canada.

Sylvain Letang, a financial security advisor from the Gatineau region, was immediately but provisionally stricken off the roll after he allegedly placed himself in a conflict of interest by borrowing $92,3000 from clients. It is alleged that he also misappropriated $5,000 from a client.

Allegations of conflict of interest against three judges dismissed

The Canadian Judicial Council has dismissed allegations of conflicts by three judges who attended privately sponsored receptions or conferences.

The three judges, all of whom hear tax cases, landed in hot water after the CBC and Radio-Canada reported that they had attended social events at an International Fiscal Association Conference in Madrid in September 2016. The conference was approved by the CJC as a continuing education opportunity for judges involved in tax law matters.

Former president of Quebec legal society temporarily disbarred

Stéphane Rivard could not bear to open correspondence from the Quebec taxman.

During a stretch of four years, between 2007 and 2011, letters outlining collection procedures and seizures launched against him by Revenue Quebec were put by the wayside. Rulings by Quebec Superior Court and by the Federal Court of Canada in 2012 over his tax affairs too were ignored.

On February 2015, it all came to a head when Revenue Quebec sought a petition in bankruptcy, a development that was reported by a French-language paper.