All posts filed under: Public law

Landmark decision issued by Quebec appeal court over the freedom of peaceful assembly

The Quebec appeal struck down a municipal bylaw that compelled organizers of public demonstrations to submit their plans and itinerary to city police, a landmark decision commended as a “genuine advance” on the “least judicially explored freedom” and the first decision by a Canadian appellate court that comprehensively examines the scope of the freedom of peaceful assembly (2c) as a separate Charter right.

Quebec inquiry that examined treatment of Indigenous people calls for changes to justice system

It will take a healthy dose of political will, huge investments and nearly a generation for the Quebec government to implement the wide-ranging recommendations an inquiry that examined treatment of Indigenous people made to the province’s justice and correctional systems, according to legal experts.

Quebec expanding pilot program to prevent addicts convicted of crimes from reoffending

A pilot program that began six years ago to help Montreal alcoholics and drug addicts convicted of crimes from reoffending will be expanded across the province, announced Quebec Minister of Justice Stephanie Vallée.

Why it matters: The program, offered initially only to detainees while their cases were pending, will now be expanded to include people who are not detained while charged with a crime.

Quebec Court of Appeal voids bylaw forcing protesters to provide itinerary to police

A City of Montreal bylaw that forced protesters to provide an itinerary to police ahead of time was struck down by the Quebec Court of Appeal after it ruled that it was arbitrary, excessive, and unreasonable.

Why it matters: The decision limits the discretionary powers a municipality can confer to police and sheds light on how the Charter protection of freedom of expression applies to demonstrations.