All posts tagged: OECD

OECD hopes reforms will end era of tax avoidance

An unprecedented international collaboration on tax reform that recently unveiled sweeping plans to crack down on aggressive tax planning by multinational companies has the potential of becoming the biggest shake-up in international tax rules in nearly a century, according to tax professionals.

Endorsed by G20 finance ministers and leaders, the ambitious proposals by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) aims to close loopholes, increase transparency to assist tax authorities in risk assessments, and restrict the use of tax havens to curb many international tax planning strategies.

The plan, known as the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) project, lists 15 specific actions intended to establish coherent rules for corporate income taxation, prevent tax treaty abuse, tackle the tax challenged posed by the digital economy, and amend the world’s 3,000 bilateral tax treaties through a multilateral instrument.

Tax competition stirs controversy

Barely a month after the European Commission ruled that Starbucks Corp. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV benefited from illegal tax deals from the Dutch and Luxembourg governments, cross-border tax avoidance will be the subject of yet more intense scrutiny after European Union lawmakers decided recently to quiz 11 multinational corporations over sweet-heart tax deals with governments.

While multinationals are under growing public criticism for using tax avoidance strategies such as assigning valuable patent rights to shell companies based in tax havens or receiving interest deductions for payments made to their own subsidiaries, tax competition too is responsible for the dire situation, said Peter Dietsch, author “Catching Capital – The Ethics of Tax Competition.”

Ambitious international effort to rewrite tax rules at risk

An ambitious international effort calling for a coordinated approach to rewrite global tax rules over profit shifting risks being undermined by the number of growing countries that are unilaterally introducing significant tax reforms, warn tax experts.

The Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), backed by the G20 Finance Ministers, proposed in July 2013 a sweeping series of proposals that take aim at aggressive international tax planning by multinational companies in the wake of intense political scrutiny and public outcry over the likes of Apple Inc., Google Inc. and Starbucks moving billions of profits out of higher-tax countries into low or no-tax jurisdictions.

The plan, known as Base Erosion Profit Shifting (BEPS), lists 15 specific actions that will attempt to tackle tax challenges of the digital economy, establish coherent rules for corporate income taxation, prevent tax treaty abuse, increase transparency by taxpayers, and amend the world’s 3,000 bilateral tax treaties through a multilateral instrument.

OECD report challenges widely-held assumptions on foreign bribery

The majority of foreign bribes were paid by large companies, usually with the knowledge of senior management, to officials from developed countries to win contracts and cut through red tape, reveals an eye-opening report from a leading think tank that shatters many commonly-held preconceptions about corruption risks.

The report by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, which analyzed 427 foreign bribery cases over the past 15 years, should prompt companies to review and tailor their anti-corruption compliance programs, particularly since nearly a third of the cases occurred in the extractive and construction sector, areas where Canadians are big world players, say compliance experts.

“It’s possible to do business without corruption,” said Milos Barutciski, the co-head of international trade at Bennett Jones LLP in Toronto.